What is DevOps?


DevOps (a clipped compound of "development" and "operations") is a software development methodology that combines software development (Dev) with information technology operations (Ops). The goal of DevOps is to shorten the systems development life cycle while also delivering features, fixes, and updates frequently in close alignment with business objectives.The DevOps approach is to include automation and event monitoring at all steps of the software build.


What are the goals of DevOps?

The goals of DevOps span the entire delivery pipeline. They include:

  • Improved deployment frequency;
  • Faster time to market;
  • Lower failure rate of new releases;
  • Shortened lead time between fixes;
  • Faster mean time to recovery (in the event of a new release crashing or otherwise disabling the current system).

Simple processes become increasingly programmable and dynamic, using a DevOps approach. DevOps aims to maximize the predictability, efficiency, security, and maintainability of operational processes. Very often, automation supports this objective.

DevOps integration targets product deliverycontinuous testingquality testing, feature development, and maintenance releases in order to improve reliability and security and provide faster development and deployment cycles. Many of the ideas (and people) involved in DevOps came from the enterprise systems management and agile software development movements.


Benefits of DevOps

Companies that practice DevOps have reported significant benefits, including: significantly shorter time to market, improved customer satisfaction, better product quality, more reliable releases, improved productivity and efficiency, and the increased ability to build the right product by fast experimentation.



Toolchain

As DevOps is intended to be a cross-functional mode of working, rather than a single DevOps tool, there are sets (or "toolchains") of multiple tools. Such DevOps tools are expected to fit into one or more of these categories, reflective of key aspects of the development and delivery process:

  1. Code — code development and review, source code management tools, code merging
  2. Build — continuous integration tools, build status
  3. Test — continuous testing tools that provide feedback on business risks
  4. Package — artifact repository, application pre-deployment staging
  5. Release — change management, release approvals, release automation
  6. Configure — infrastructure configuration and management, Infrastructure as Code tools
  7. Monitor — applications performance monitoring, end–user experience

Note that there exist different interpretations of the DevOps toolchain (e.g. Plan, Create, Verify, Package, Release, Configure, and Monitor).

Some categories are more essential in a DevOps toolchain than others.


Please refer DevOps ToolChain
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